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but geographically over to egypt, because as you know, we went there. now we have a unique situation in israel that, as we've said, creates all kinds of fascinating but somewhat negative issues regarding ethics. egypt was a different story, because here, we have a predominantly muslim country. now you know, i'm sure you're well aware of that. in egypt- i mean, in israel, the political power is held by the jews; as we heard, the christians are a minority, even christian arabs, and they don't know what they're doing even with a partition. but in egypt, obviously, we have a muslim majority. now what happens here is we had a fascinating interview with reverend noor. we've already seen coptic christians that have for centuries well beyond the muslims, before the muslims enjoyed something of a, you know, left alone for the most part, allowed to exist. but we have protestant christians actually in egypt, and we had a chance to chat with reverend noor who heads up an evangelical protestant church there- a world renowned figure on the level of billy graham in that part of the country, and to hear his strugg
made the lesser pilgrimage to mecca, he went to pakistan, he went to egypt. and most disappointing for him was what he saw in saudi arabia. he expected a beautiful place, you know, the best place on earth, and when he got there, it was just the opposite. as far as physical conditions, it might have been almost the worst place on earth, you know. and he came back and he stopped, he changed his emphasis from religion to business, in economics- that's how disappointed he was. and he told us that we can't look to go there; he said we have to find our life right here in america. he said that everything we need, we can have it right here in america. so he changed his direction for us, he changed his vision for the future. >> you know, i wanted to run this by you. i don't know if you had a chance- the way i've spoken about it, and we had some notes here, is when we speak about religion, we talk about two very fundamental things, and one is identity- you know, who you are- and one is your relationship with god or with other people. and to try to make sense of elijah muhammad's teaching of
't imagine a member of bishop thomas or brother mark in st. macarius monastery out in the deserts of egypt a good christian. i can't imagine him having a real good time hanging out at that particular church. but both places really do maintain an authentic christianity for them, and that's all that we are saying here, it's balancing those dilemmas of institutionalization within that ecological mix it. >> i have a couple of questions. that one that you taped was that a sunday sermon or was that an extra? >> saturday evening. >> saturday evening. >> that's the hot one. >> so what they repeated that sunday morning? >> i should add that there are several other ministries and this is the one, saturday night one is where they bring in a lot of new comers. that's where it's most entertaining. now there's other services and the people who are part of the church they are much more typically i don't want to say benevolent, but more low key, something along those lines. >> so, what ever it is it's working? >> oh yes. >> seeing the number of people that are there who might not otherwise attend but - an
experientially a man who goes deeply- we talked about the roots, you know, the coptic bishop in egypt and other- the roots go so deep that you learn to love, and that comes out and we certainly hear this from the rare interview. yeah, jamie? >> i understand that diabetics must be fed on a regular, rigid, timely routine. so my question is, do you know if a diabetic muslim would still be expected to fast? >> i certainly don't. >> i do. >> oh, well, okay, virginia? >> yes. nursing mothers, babies, and sick do not have to observe ramadan. >> okay. that's part of it. sure. >> when we were first married, we lived in a flat upstairs a muslim couple, forty years ago, and it was first experience with a muslim person- he was a bosnian from yugoslavia; she was a turk- and what amazed me was their very great hospitality. "come. eat. come. stay. if you go to turkey, stay as long as you want. i'll call my mother, i'll call my aunt, i'll... stay." >> yes. the coffee. the coffee and the sweets. >> the good coffee. "eat. eat. eat again." i very rarely experienced that kind of hospitality. even if you should tra
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4